Ferguson’s 7 Questions With… Shane Ormond

Shane
We have another contributor to the upcoming Cork Sci-Fi Comic on 7 questions (I’m looking forward to seeing that book). It’s writer Shane Ormond.

What was the first comic work you did that was published?

I had a couple of stories that have been accepted but none of them have come out yet. The first one to see the light of day will be a dystopian-future-comedy set in Cork City (Artist: Kevin Keane; Letterer: Colin O’ Mahony). That’s for the Cork Sci-Fi comic coming out on the 24th of April. The second is a slightly longer Japanese-inspired piece (Artist: Chris O’Halloran) for a Turncoat Press book that’ll be released later in the year. Both artists were great to work with, by the by.

What is the biggest thing you have learned since that book?

Know your story, know your space, and make sure they fit each other. There’s no point in trying to distill your novel idea into an A5 pamphlet. Also, find someone who knows what they’re doing, listen to their advice and, more often than not, take it.

What’s your process for writing a comic book?

My process isn’t much of a process. I write and when I encounter a problem I get frustrated and stop. The answer usually comes to me when I’m chopping vegetables or trying to sleep. I guess the brain has more freedom to explore complex ideas when you’re not holding it back by forcing it to think and junk. Sometimes when it’s really bad, I try explaining the problem to someone and often end up solving the problem in the process of articulating it.

What is the biggest influence on your work?

Anyone who writes with a little restraint and goes the extra mile to make their work more immersive. Just because you’re writing a brooding sexy drama doesn’t mean you should get away with boring unrealistic dialogue or blatant exposition. The only thing that has my full attention right now is Better Call Saul. The characters reveal themselves piece by piece through small actions and conversations, rather than a character telling another character how much of an asshole someone is because of what he did in the last episode. It gives you the information and let’s you make your own decisions, just like real life.

Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth, Locke & Key, and Powers, immediately jump to mind as books I’ve particularly enjoyed.

What are you working on right now?

Chris just sent me the first coloured page for our Turncoat Press story, which looked great. I’m in the early stages of planning a larger script at the moment so, needless to say, I’m not sleeping very well.

What do you out now or coming out next?

After the Cork book and the Turncoat book, I have a story in a Greyhaven Steampunk anthology. It’s probably the earliest book I worked on but it’s an international affair and has taken longer to put together. I worked on that story with Jerome Canty (also from Cork but currently lives in Scotland) who has this great 2000ad-esque super detailed style. That was a lot of fun to do but had little to no dialogue. I’m a big fan of the talkies.

What is your favourite Irish comic?

I recently read Stray Lines, the Cardboard press anthology, and was really impressed with a lot of what was in there. Lots of nice artwork and people willing to take risks (and a couple of big ole floppy wieners to boot).

EXTERNAL LINKS

Comics In Cork: https://www.facebook.com/comicsincork